FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY

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FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY

Fundus photography (also called fundography[1]) is the creation of a photograph of the interior surface of the eye, including the retina, optic disc, macula, and posterior pole (i.e. the fundus) Fundus photography is used by optometrists, ophthalmologists, and trained medical professionals for monitoring progression of a disease, diagnosis of a disease (combined with retinal angiography), […]

Fundus photography (also called fundography[1]) is the creation of a photograph of the interior surface of the eye, including the retina, optic disc, macula, and posterior pole (i.e. the fundus)

Fundus photography is used by optometrists, ophthalmologists, and trained medical professionals for monitoring progression of a disease, diagnosis of a disease (combined with retinal angiography), or in screening programs, where the photos can be analysed later.

Compared to ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography generally needs a considerably larger instrument, but has the advantage of availing the image to be examined by a specialist at another location and/or time, as well as providing photo documentation for future reference. Modern fundus photographs generally recreate considerably larger areas of the fundus than what can be seen at any one time with handheld ophthalmoscopes.

What is it?

This is an imaging technique used to take photographs of the retina. This is useful to monitor the progression of conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and glaucoma.

How is it done?

You place your chin on the instrument chin rest and fixate a target light within the instrument lens. Several images are captured within a few minutes. You will see a bright flash of light as each image is taken which may dazzle your eyes for a few minutes. Occasionally dilating drops may need to be used prior to fundus photography especially for patients with small pupils.

Indications

Fundus photography is used to detect and evaluate symptoms of retinal detachment or eye diseases such as glaucoma. In patients with headaches, the finding of swollen optic discs, or papilledema, on fundus photography is a key sign, as this indicates raised intracranial pressure (ICP) which could be due to hydrocephalus, benign intracranial hypertension (aka pseudotumorcerebri) or brain tumor, amongst other conditions. Cupped optic discs are seen in glaucoma.

In patients with diabetes mellitus, regular fundus examinations (once every 6 months to 1 year) are important to screen for diabetic retinopathy as visual loss due to diabetes can be prevented by retinal laser treatment if retinopathy is spotted early. In arterial hypertension, hypertensive changes of the retina closely mimic those in the brain, and may predict cerebrovascular accidents (strokes).

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